CM – Australian postal packaging will now have a place for First Nations place names in time for NAIDOC

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Australia Post has released a new range of envelopes specifically designed to hold traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Country names.

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Just in time for NAIDOC Week, Australia Post has released a new range of envelopes specifically for the traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Country names.

The New Australia Post packaging will now include a special box for people to fill in so people can write the country of the First Nation just above the address. The introduction of the new packaging will begin this week during NAIDOC.

And finally, an initiative worth writing home about…. Australia Post can accommodate traditional place names on parcel addresses. Love this @auspost 💕

Gomeroi woman Rachael McPhail asked Australia Post to make the change as part of a campaign to include traditional place names in all addresses. McPhail has advocated the use of traditional country names for years.

It’s an important step in the right direction. McPhail told the ABC that there was still work to be done, however. The next step is to put together a comprehensive database of all the traditional place names so people can easily find out where to send their mail.

So proud of &, inspired by my Baawaa Rach who worked for YEARS that this happens 🔥👇🏽

‘Australia Post has released a new range of envelopes specifically designed to accommodate traditional Aboriginal place names and the Torres Strait Islander’ https://t.co/mHOCMmhTKX

One comprehensive database requires nationwide collaboration, but vital work well worth it. Campaigns like that of McPhail will help introduce people to traditional place names from other parts of the country and normalize the use of traditional place names against colonizer names.

It is worth noting that many Blak and First Nations companies have already encouraged their clients and customers to use traditional place names. Many also use traditional place names on their packaging. 10 news also used traditional place names in their weather forecast last night.

On the first day of NAIDOC my tru gawd gave me: traditional place names on TV pic.twitter.com/mZdeA4BjV5

The use of traditional place names fits this year perfectly NAIDOC theme, Heal Country. There is still a long way to go to heal the wounds of attempted genocide and the continued attempted colonization of the First Nations on this continent. But you’ll never heal a land you can’t name.

So be sure to consult the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) map of indigenous lands and familiarize yourself with the traditional names and owners trusted for the next package you send.

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Keywords:

Australia Post,First Nations,Aboriginal Australians,Australia Post, First Nations, Aboriginal Australians,,,,,First Nations,indigenous heritage,naidoc,

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