20.5 C
Yaoundé
lundi, novembre 28, 2022
Home Tags Freedom of the press

Tag: Freedom of the press

. . PARIS (Reuters) - A bill that would make it a crime in certain circumstances to spread a picture of a police officer's face is not intended to violate journalists' right to cover public events, French Prime Minister Jean Castex said Tuesday. French legal activists and journalists have protested the bill that anyone who promotes the image of a police officer with the intent to harm the officer will be jailed for one year and fined 45. 000 euros can be occupied. Castex told parliament that the government is not aiming for freedom of the press or freedom of expression, but wants to protect the police from the spread of images and text intended to harm the police force. "The aim is not to prevent anyone from filming or broadcasting pictures that illuminate a fact or a public event," said Castex, who will be holding talks with journalists' unions this week. Opponents say the bill, drafted by two MPs from President Emmanuel Macron's centrist party, would violate the freedom of journalists to report on public events and make it harder to hold officials accountable if, for example, they are excessive Use force while holding a suspect. The government has already added a line to the bill stating that it "does not violate the right to information". . The law should be passed later on Tuesday in the National Assembly, in which Macron's party has a majority. Some MPs of the party have announced that they will vote against the bill. Alluding to the opposition, Castex said the government itself would - once passed - submit the bill to the Constitutional Council to see if it was in line with the constitution. Opposition parties often turn to the council when they contest the constitutionality of a law. (Reporting by Elizabeth Pineau; writing by Geert De Clercq; editing by Mark Heinrich)
. . PARIS (Reuters) - A bill that would make it a crime in certain circumstances to spread a picture of a police officer's face is not intended to violate journalists' right to cover public events, French Prime Minister Jean Castex said Tuesday. French legal activists and journalists have protested the bill that anyone who promotes the image of a police officer with the intent to harm the officer will be jailed for one year and fined 45. 000 euros can be occupied. Castex told parliament that the government is not aiming for freedom of the press or freedom of expression, but wants to protect the police from the spread of images and text intended to harm the police force. "The aim is not to prevent anyone from filming or broadcasting pictures that illuminate a fact or a public event," said Castex, who will be holding talks with journalists' unions this week. Opponents say the bill, drafted by two MPs from President Emmanuel Macron's centrist party, would violate the freedom of journalists to report on public events and make it more difficult to hold officials accountable if, for example, they are excessive Use force while holding a suspect. The government has already added a line to the bill stating that it "does not violate the right to information". . The law should be passed later on Tuesday in the National Assembly, in which Macron's party has a majority. Some MPs of the party have announced that they will vote against the bill. Alluding to the opposition, Castex said the government itself would - once passed - submit the bill to the Constitutional Council to see if it was in line with the constitution. Opposition parties often turn to the council when they contest the constitutionality of a law. (Reporting by Elizabeth Pineau; writing by Geert De Clercq; editing by Mark Heinrich)
. . PARIS (Reuters) - A bill that would make it a crime in certain circumstances to spread a picture of a police officer's face is not intended to violate journalists' right to cover public events, French Prime Minister Jean Castex said Tuesday. French legal activists and journalists have protested the bill that anyone who promotes the image of a police officer with the intent to harm the officer will be jailed for one year and fined 45 for conviction. 000 euros (53. 450 US dollars). Castex told parliament that the government is not aiming for freedom of the press or freedom of expression, but wants to protect the police from the spread of images and text intended to harm the police force. "The aim is not to prevent anyone from filming or broadcasting pictures that illuminate a fact or a public event," said Castex, who will be holding talks with journalists' unions this week. Opponents say the bill, drafted by two MPs from President Emmanuel Macron's centrist party, would violate the freedom of journalists to report on public events and make it harder to hold officials accountable if, for example, they are excessive Use force while holding a suspect. The government has already added a line to the bill stating that it "does not violate the right to information". . The law should be passed later on Tuesday in the National Assembly, in which Macron's party has a majority. Some MPs of the party have announced that they will vote against the bill. Alluding to the opposition, Castex said the government itself would - once passed - submit the bill to the Constitutional Council to see if it was in line with the constitution. Opposition parties often turn to the council when they contest the constitutionality of a law. (Reporting by Elizabeth Pineau; writing by Geert De Clercq; editing by Mark Heinrich)
. . PARIS (Reuters) - A bill that would make it a crime under certain circumstances to spread a picture of a police officer's face is not intended to violate journalists' right to cover public events, French Prime Minister Jean Castex said Tuesday. French legal activists and journalists have protested the bill that anyone who promotes the image of a police officer with the intent to harm the officer will be jailed for one year and fined 45. 000 euros can be occupied. Castex told parliament that the government is not aiming for freedom of the press or freedom of expression, but wants to protect the police from the spread of images and text intended to harm the police force. "The aim is not to prevent anyone from filming or broadcasting pictures that illuminate a fact or a public event," said Castex, who will be holding talks with journalists' unions this week. Opponents say the bill, drafted by two MPs from President Emmanuel Macron's centrist party, would violate the freedom of journalists to report on public events and make it harder to hold officials accountable if, for example, they are excessive Use force while holding a suspect. The government has already added a line to the bill stating that it "does not violate the right to information". . The law should be passed later on Tuesday in the National Assembly, in which Macron's party has a majority. Some MPs of the party have announced that they will vote against the bill. Alluding to the opposition, Castex said the government itself would - once passed - submit the bill to the Constitutional Council to see if it was in line with the constitution. Opposition parties often turn to the council when they contest the constitutionality of a law. (Reporting by Elizabeth Pineau; writing by Geert De Clercq; editing by Mark Heinrich)
. A bill that under certain circumstances would make it a crime to distribute a picture of a police officer cleared the first hurdle in the French parliament on Tuesday despite protests from right-wing activists.
L'UNESCO, en partenariat avec le Conseil suprême de l'audiovisuel et de la communication (CSAC) et Journaliste en danger (JED) et l'Union nationale de la presse du Congo (UNPC), a organisé le mardi 10 novembre le Forum de la création
Ce site, comme beaucoup d’autres, utilise des petits fichiers appelés cookies pour nous aider à améliorer et personnaliser votre expérience.
Accepter
Privacy Policy